Posts Tagged ‘candidate skills’

Can recruitment tools be used for Volunteers?

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2011
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Volunteering is rewarding and socially beneficial. It’s rewarding for people who want to use their professional skills and knowledge to benefit others, to give back to an organisation that has positively impacted on their life, either directly or indirectly or make a difference to the lives of others less fortunate. Socially, it can also be a great way to meet new people, make new friends and get to know your local community.

However the wider sociological and economic impact of volunteering can’t be ignored.  With the highest youth unemployment in decades – volunteering is also a great way of gaining new skills, knowledge and experience, enhancing a CV and improving one’s employment prospects.

Volunteering can be rewarding and socially beneficial.

As an ageing UK population volunteering also offers opportunities for older people who are now working longer, who have valuable skills and experience.
It is also for many organisations an important route to other types of engagement with the organisation, such as part time or full time working.

Click here to read more of PPS’ Managing Director, Amanda Marques’ thoughts on recruiting volunteers

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Talent Pools – What are they?

Thursday, November 10th, 2011
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What are Talent Pools?

A talent pool is typically defined as a database consisting of profiles of candidates who are actively interested in your organisation. If companies have to fill a vacancy, they can draw on the talent pool and look for a means of profile-matching appropriate applicants and job opportunities.

 In the RPO world they are a great tool for helping clients to recruit more efficiently.

Talent pools are usually created when:

  • There is a surplus of candidates that meet the requirements of the role.
  • Candidates apply for a role where although they may not be suitable for that role, they would be an ideal candidate for another.
  • Candidates apply for a role where they are slightly out of the area or have a mismatched salary requirement.

The Benefits of Talent Pools

Click here to read about the benefits of talent pools

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The impact of personal interests and hobbies on job applications

Thursday, October 27th, 2011
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At PPS we screen thousands of job applications daily on behalf of our clients, working to set criteria that we have worked together to create.

We are seeing more and more employers add extracurricular activities and hobbies to their short listing criteria, giving more weight to this area of an application as a potential deciding factor during a selection process.

Most CVs have a section in which candidates can state their hobbies and interests away from the workplace. Opinions between recruiters are divided as to whether this section is relevant in actually landing a job. But there are a few hobbies and interests that demand attention on a CV and will be picked up on by a potential employer. Tips for an interview

Relevant hobbies and interests are activities that may be appropriate to the employment you are seeking. For instance, if a candidate were seeking a job position that entailed overseeing staff, then hobbies such as being the captain of a local football team may be significant in displaying leadership qualities. If a candidate undertakes voluntary work at Citizens Advice offices or national associations such as the Samaritans, then it could illustrate good people skills.

Most employers will have looked over a CV before interviewing a candidate. Interesting or unusual pastimes could act as ice breakers at the beginning of an interview. Hobbies such as scuba diving, skiing, dancing and horse riding may not seem unusual to the candidate, but they will be a good talking point for an interviewer. Golf may not seem a usual hobby for most, but many big  companies have some form of sports team, and it is a subtle way of showing that a candidate is a team player.

Many advertisements for jobs now specify a range of desired traits, so match these to your leisure interests. Offer variety and avoid lists. Specific detail is what makes it interesting to the reader, so give examples and emphasize any significant achievements related to your interests. It’s all about making a good first impression and capturing the interest of your recruiter so avoid the obvious pitfalls when including your hobbies, and steer the recruiters towards interests that add to your employability.

Recruiters what do you think? Do you pay any attention to this aspect of a candidate’s application or CV?

And job seekers, do you think your hobbies or extracurricular activities should impact your job application to an employer?

By Louise Birch, a recruiter at PPS.

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